Let’s-Quit-This-Little-Dance-We-Do-For-Twitter-Followers

Let’s-Quit-This-Little-Dance-We-Do-For-Twitter-Followers

The ill-advised focus that some organizations and people give to acquiring masses of Twitter followers, and the tactics they employ to inflate their numbers, sometimes boggles my mind.

What got me thinking about this topic is a recent experience I’ve had on RGB Social’s Twitter account where one enthusiastic handle has followed and unfollowed us no less than a half dozen times over the course of the last few weeks, I’m assuming in hopes of receiving an apparently coveted follow-back.

To this user what I’ll say is this, sorry,Follow accounts that are going to be meaningful to you, not out of a sense of obligation but your little dance isn’t going to work here.

RGB Social doesn’t have a huge Twitter following, nor is it currently growing at such a rapid speed that it’s difficult to keep a keen eye on who has decided to follow our feed. (And I’m okay with this, in case you’re wondering)

I like to see who has decided to follow as it gives me a bit of qualitative evidence pertaining to the effectiveness is of our approach for using Twitter.

Generally, I like to see that followers are people that could have some impact on our business. This could include current or prospective clients, potential partners, marketers, advertisers, students, businesses doing interesting things, social platforms, developers of social tools, people that engage in interesting and relevant discussions, and the list goes on.

Criteria for receiving a follow from our handle does not include simply following us.

Sorry, but it ain’t that simple.

I don’t want to be following everyone under the sun because it dilutes the value we get from our Twitter feed.

Sure, lists allow us to organize feeds of content that we find to be of most value, but if we render our main feed useless by following handles that don’t meet certain criteria, then of what value is our follow unless your handle is included in a list?

It would be great to see a shift away from ‘Twitter follower etiquette’, expectations, and such a tremendous focus on acquiring followers.

We should all be following accounts that are going to be meaningful to us – plain and simple – not out of a sense of obligation. Sometimes this means that follows won’t be reciprocated, and that’s really okay.

_

What criteria do you use to determine if you’ll follow a certain Twitter handle?

Do you have any experiences to share of pushy Twitter handles trying to coerce a follow out of you?

It would be great to chat with you more about this in the comments, or on Twitter @RGBSocial

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  1. […] The ill-advised focus that some organizations and people give to acquiring masses of Twitter followers, and the tactics they employ to inflate their numbers, is sometimes mind boggling. Read mor…  […]

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Community Management, Engagement, Interaction, Social Media, Twitter

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