For those getting started in a community management role, there is frequently temptation to over communicate with your audience, which is understandable. If you don’t have much experience, the feeling of managing a community of thousands, to hundreds of thousands of fans can be exhilarating, a byproduct of which is to show as much love as possible. This love typically manifests itself through over liking, and over commenting on community involvement.

The problem with this is that by liking every interaction, or responding to every comment, you mitigate the significance and meaning of those likes and comments, which ideally should be used as an acknowledgement, or special reward, for exemplary fan involvement. When over-used, likes and comments can become expected, or even worse, an annoyance and inhibitor of the type of behaviour you should be nurturing.

Save your likes and comments for those fans who really go above and beyond…

If a fan submits a valuable piece of highly relevant content, like it.

If a fan demonstrates extreme loyalty to your brand, like it.

If a fan instigates an overwhelmingly positive conversation about your product, like it.

If a fan responds to a question in your post with the minimum amount of effort, maybe reserve that like for something more deserving.

How do you use ‘likes’ and comments to reward your Facebook community? How do you reward them on other social platforms? It would be great to hear from you in the comments, or email me at matthew@rgbsocial.com

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Community Management

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